As a school we have identified 5 learning pathways. This allows our pupils to access a broad and balanced curriculum which takes into account academic, social,  physical and emotional development.

Foundations

Description of need:

Formal

The children in Foundations are our youngest pupils in school and they all require a significant level of adult support to access their curriculum which is primarily based around developing communication, daily living skills, social interaction skills and the skills needed to prepare them for learning. They have extremely short attention spans and find it difficult to focus, even for a very short period of time. They can become fixated on repeated actions such as making a specific noise while banging a door. A large majority of these children are non-verbal and require additional communication aids such as PECs books or objects of reference, they all have individual SALT targets set by our SALT therapist. During the Foundations Pathway a number of basic skills are focussed on including: mark making, recognising familiar environments and areas and 1:1 correspondence.

Informal

These pupils often present with a wide range of sensory needs which can prevent them from accessing learning and makes it difficult for them to attend to an activity for more than a couple of minutes. They demonstrate fleeting attention spans and are easily distracted, while their attention may be held momentarily by the dominant stimuli in the classroom this is easily lost when a different stimuli takes its place. These pupils require regular sensory interventions and specialist equipment such as weighted jackets, blankets and specific sensory diets to ensure that they remain on a baseline that enables them to function in the classroom. There is a significant emphasis on daily living skills for these pupils as many of them are not toilet trained or just beginning to use the toilet independently.

Expanding pupils restricted diets and developing their ability to eat independently is also a focus along with developing resilience and tolerance of their peers.

Intent:

 Pupils follow curriculum themes based on the Early Learning Goals. They work on a 1:1 basis or in a small group with one other pupils.

Pupils have access to continuous provision and the outside areas of the classroom.

 

Implementation:

 

The Formal Curriculum

Foundation subjects are delivered through topic themes which are updated each half term. Work is differentiated into approximately three levels depending on the specific needs of the class, this may sometimes mean that activities are planned for individual children. Activities are presented in a very practical way and key language is modelled throughout all activities. Pupils need a significant level of adult support to  access activities which are designed to reinforce key concepts. All pupils have personalised IEP targets which are designed to develop language, early English and Maths skills, daily living skills and sensory needs. Daily work box tasks are modelled by adults and scaffolded to develop fine motor skills. The pupils follow strands of the ABLLS curriculum. Where appropriate some children develop early phonic skills, such as distinguishes between different sounds.

The Informal Curriculum

This is an essential part of the curriculum for our Foundations pupils where developing communication, independence, life skills and preparing for learning is a priority. A large majority of our Foundations pupils have specific sensory diets, set by our school OT, (SHINE Therapy), and participate in specific sensory activities throughout the day using sensory equipment such as weighted clothes, ear defenders etc. Alongside this pupils participate in sensory circuits, usually twice a day. They also access our light and sensory rooms throughout the day as well as our outdoor provision. During these sessions communication targets are developed as well as social interaction skills. Pupils have access to a continuous provision of activities, adults use this to model play and encourage the children to participate and begin to play alongside each other. All pupils have specific communication targets which are worked on throughout the school day, either as a stand-alone activity or within a topic, most pupils also access 1:1 sessions with our SALT therapist. Foundation pupils benefit from

Attention Autism sessions at least three times a week. They generally participate in the first two stages, developing their ability to sustain attention Fine and gross motor skills are developed throughout the curriculum with pupils also accessing specific soft play sessions as well as participating in daily dough disco sessions.

Where appropriate pupils also participate in weekly cookery sessions to develop sequencing, fine motor skills and life skills.

 

Impact

 

The impact of our curriculum is assessed in a number of different ways.

 The Formal Curriculum

This is assessed using Bsquared and foundation subject assessments. IEP targets are continuously assessed and final assessments are shared with parents each term. All pupils are baselines when they enter school. Key words, reading, comprehension and spelling ages are all assessed on baseline and at the end of an academic year.

The Informal Curriculum

Parents views, SALT and SHINE impact reports. SLEUTH data.

 

Footsteps

Description of need:
The Formal Curriculum
These pupils require a very high level of support to access their curriculum which is based around developing skills to prepare them for
learning. They have very short attention spans and find it difficult to focus, they may often move around the classroom and find it difficult to
remain seated on a chair. They have limited mark making abilities and respond best to practical and structured tasks. During the Footsteps
Pathway a number of basic skills are focussed on including: mark making, cutting and sticking, sequencing, recognising familiar
environments and areas and 1:1 correspondence. In English and Maths work is focussed on recognising and beginning to use initial sounds
and numbers within 10. These pupils may have very limited language with poor receptive and expressive skills and so will have personal
SALT targets which may include specific language programmes such as PECs.

 The Informal Curriculum
These pupils often present with a range of sensory needs which can prevent them from accessing learning, for example, pacing, difficulties
being near certain noises or smells, sensory seeking behaviour. These pupils require regular sensory breaks and specialist equipment such
as weighted jackets, blankets and specific sensory diets.
There is a significant emphasis on daily living skills for these pupils including developing toileting skills and the ability to dress independently,
for example, putting on their own coats or shoes. Expanding pupils restricted diets and developing their ability to eat independently is also a
focus along with developing resilience and tolerance of their peers.
Intent:
Pupils follow curriculum themes based on the National Curriculum and an adapted and modified curriculum using the Early Learning Goals.
They work on a 1:1 basis and in small group work. Pupils have access to continuous provision where appropriate and a range of practical
learning experiences.

Implementation:
The Formal Curriculum
Foundation subjects are delivered through topic themes which are updated each half term. Work is differentiated into approximately three
levels depending on the specific needs of the class. Activities are presented in a very practical way and key skills are reinforced throughout
the curriculum in order to embed knowledge. Pupils need a high level of adult support to formally record work and activities. All pupils have
personalised English and Maths IEP targets which are taught in specific IEP sessions and more discretely through the topic work. Pupils
complete daily work boxes designed to develop basic skills as well as independence.

 

The Informal Curriculum

This is an essential part of the curriculum for our Footsteps pupils where developing independence, life skills and preparing for learning is a priority. A large majority of our Footsteps pupils have specific sensory diets, set by our school OT, (SHINE Therapy), and participate in specific sensory activities throughout the day using sensory equipment such as weighted clothes, ear defenders etc. Alongside this pupils participate in daily sensory circuits and access our light and sensory rooms as well as our outdoor provision. Sensory trays are available for pupils to access throughout the day. All pupils have specific communication targets which are worked on throughout the school day, either as a stand-alone activity or within a topic, some pupils also access 1:1 sessions with our SALT therapist. Pupils may also participate in Lego Therapy to help develop social interaction and specific language targets such as positional language. Footsteps pupils benefit from Attention Autism sessions at least twice a week. These sessions are designed to develop attention and turn taking skills as well as developing independence skills. Fine and gross motor skills are developed through the curriculum with pupils also accessing specific soft play sessions as well as participating in daily dough disco sessions. Where appropriate pupils also participate in weekly cookery sessions to develop sequencing, fine motor skills and life skills.
Impact
The impact of our curriculum is assessed in a number of different ways.
The Formal Curriculum
This is assessed using Bsquared and foundation subject assessments. IEP targets are continuously assessed and final assessments are
shared with parents each term. All pupils are baselines when they enter school. Key words, reading, comprehension and spelling ages are
all assessed on baseline and at the end of an academic year.
The Informal Curriculum
Parents views, SALT and SHINE impact reports. SLEUTH data.

Stepping Stones

Description of need:
The Formal Curriculum
These pupils continue to require a high level of support to access their curriculum which is based around developing basic skills. Their
attention remains rigid and they are beginning to tolerate a shift in attention although this needs to be well timed and they need preparation
for it. These children can only cope with doing one thing at a time. They respond best to practical and structured tasks. During the Stepping
Stones Pathway pupils are encouraged to develop early phonic skills to enable them to blend and segment words following Letters and
Sounds. They develop mark making skills to record simple phonetic words and basic sentences. Pupils number knowledge is also
developed so that they can recognise bigger numbers and begin to calculate and record simple addition and subtraction problems. These
pupils may access specific interventions such as Thriving Reading, the Power of 1 and Plus 2. They also access specific IEP work sessions
to target specific learning goals. A number of these pupils may have specific sensory diets and SALT targets.

The Informal Curriculum
These pupils often present with a range of sensory needs which can make sustaining attention during a work session difficult. They may
require sensory breaks, opportunities to leave their seat or specialist sensory equipment to use in the class.
There is a significant emphasis on extending the pupils ability to attend to activities and they are encouraged to begin recognise some of
their own difficulties and what they can do to help themselves overcome them. These pupils also need support to develop their resilience
and tolerance of their peers.
Intent:
Pupils follow curriculum themes based on the National Curriculum which is differentiated to meet individual needs. They work increasingly
within small groups. See progression of skills document

 Implementation: 

The Formal Curriculum
Foundation subjects are delivered through topic themes which are updated each half term. Work is differentiated into approximately three
levels depending on the specific needs of the class. Activities are presented as a range of practical and recorded activities. Key skills are
reinforced throughout the curriculum in order to embed knowledge. Where able pupils are encouraged to make links between subjects, basic
skills are reinforced through all subjects taught. Pupils continue to need a high level of adult support to formally record work and activities.
All pupils have personalised English and Maths IEP targets which are taught in specific IEP sessions and more discretely through the topic
work.

 The Informal Curriculum

This continues to be an essential part of the curriculum for our Stepping Stones pupils where developing independence, basic skills and communication are a priority. A number of our Stepping Stones pupils have specific sensory diets, set by our school OT, (SHINE Therapy), and participate in specific sensory activities throughout the day using sensory equipment such as weighted clothes, ear defenders etc. Alongside this identified pupils participate in daily sensory circuits and have opportunities to access our light and sensory rooms as well as our outdoor provision. Sensory trays are available for pupils to access throughout the day. Some pupils also run a ‘daily mile’ which is part of their alerting activities before they start work for the morning or afternoon. Most pupils have specific communication targets which are worked on throughout the school day, either as a stand-alone activity or within a topic, some pupils also access 1:1 sessions with our SALT. Pupils may also participate in Lego Therapy to help develop social interaction and specific language targets such as positional language. Stepping Stones pupils benefit from Attention Autism sessions at least once a week. These sessions are designed to develop attention and turn taking skills as well as the ability to shift attention, transition between activities and refocus while also developing independence skills. Fine and gross motor skills are developed throughout the curriculum and pupils access activities such as Cosmic Kids Yoga, Go Noodle, soft play sessions as well as participating in daily dough disco sessions. Pupils follow the Dojo points system which is used to motivate them and develop more discrete skills such as participation, collaboration etc. Well-being ‘check ins’ are used across classes using our Lego feelings board to encourage children to recognise different emotions and begin to give reasons for feeling certain emotions. 

Impact
The impact of our curriculum is assessed in a number of different ways.
The Formal Curriculum
This is assessed using Bsquared and foundation subject assessments. IEP targets are continuously assessed and final assessments are
shared with parents each term. All pupils are baselines when they enter school. Key words, reading, comprehension and spelling ages are
all assessed on baseline and at the end of an academic year.
The Informal Curriculum
Parents views, SALT and SHINE impact reports. SLEUTH data.

Reaching High

Description of need:

The Formal Curriculum

These pupils are developing their independent skills and are beginning to complete more formal, recorded work. Their attention skills are developing well and they are able continue working or playing whilst listening to an adult or peer. They are able to remain on task for longer periods of time and follow task plans more independently. During the Reaching High Pathway pupils continue to develop their phonetic and comprehension skills. They begin to have focussed SPAG sessions in class to develop specific language skills. They are encouraged to generalise skills and so when completing more extended pieces of writing SPAG skills are also emphasised. Basic mathematical concepts are developed, our Reaching High pupils continue to find generalising skills difficult, for example, they may demonstrate a good knowledge of mathematical concepts but find generalising these concepts to solve word problems very difficult. These pupils may access specific interventions such as Thriving Reading, Accelerated Reading and the Power of 1 and Plus 2. They also access specific IEP work sessions to target specific learning goals. A number of these pupils may have specific SALT targets.

The Informal Curriculum

These pupils often present with a range of sensory needs which can limit their participation in whole class activities. They may require sensory circuits or sensory breaks to allow them to refocus and return to a baseline to enable them to complete activities.  Pupils in the Reaching High Pathway can lack resilience and struggle to persevere in an activity. There is a significant emphasis on extending the pupils ability to attend to activities and they are encouraged to begin to recognise some of their own difficulties and what they can do to help themselves overcome them. These pupils also need support to develop their resilience and tolerance of their peers. They can become very frustrated in their work or with their peers, this can result in them either refusing to work or becoming very upset.

Intent:

Pupils follow curriculum themes based on the National Curriculum which is differentiated to meet individual needs. Their work is increasingly completed within groups and they are encouraged to work as independently as possible.

Implementation:

The Formal Curriculum

Foundation subjects are delivered through topic themes which are updated each half term. Work is differentiated into approximately three levels depending on the specific needs of the class. Activities are presented as a range of practical and recorded activities. Key skills are reinforced throughout the curriculum in order to embed knowledge. Where able, pupils are encouraged to make links between subjects, basic skills are reinforced through all subjects taught. Pupils continue to need adult support to formally record work and activities. All pupils have personalised English and Maths IEP targets which are taught in specific IEP sessions and more discretely through the topic work.

The Informal Curriculum

This continues to be an essential part of the curriculum for our Reaching High pupils where developing independence, tolerance and resilience and communication are a priority. Some of our Reaching High pupils have specific sensory diets, set by our school OT, (SHINE Therapy), and participate in specific sensory activities throughout the day using sensory equipment such as weighted clothes, ear defenders etc. Alongside this identified pupils participate in daily sensory circuits and complete the daily mile at the beginning of the morning and afternoon sessions. Sensory trays are available for pupils to access throughout the day. Most pupils have specific communication targets which are worked on throughout the school day, either as a standalone activity or within a topic, some pupils also access 1:1 sessions with our SALT. Pupils may also participate in Lego Therapy to help develop social interaction and specific language targets such as positional language. A small number of our Reaching High pupils benefit from Attention Autism sessions at least once a week. These sessions are designed to develop attention and turn taking skills as well as the ability to shift attention, transition between activities and refocus while also developing independence skills. Some pupils follow the AFLS curriculum, this is designed to develop a range of skills including keeping safe in the home, community, cooking and understanding the world around us. Wellbeing ‘check ins’ are used across classes using our Lego feelings board to encourage children to recognise different emotions and to give reasons for feeling certain emotions.

Impact

The impact of our curriculum is assessed in a number of different ways.

The Formal Curriculum

This is assessed using Bsquared and foundation subject assessments. IEP targets are continuously assessed and final assessments are shared with parents each term. All pupils are baselines when they enter school. Key words, reading, comprehension and spelling ages are all assessed on baseline and at the end of an academic year.

The Informal Curriculum

Parents views, SALT and SHINE impact reports. SLEUTH data.

Moving On

Description of need:
Academic
These pupils continue to develop their independent skills and are encouraged to complete more formal, recorded work. Their attention skills
are generally well developed and they are able to attend for longer periods of time as well as shifting attention when required. They are able
to remain on task for longer periods of time and follow task plans independently. They are beginning to develop their self evaluation skills
and beginning to recognise how they could change their work to improve it. During the Moving On Pathway there is an emphasis developing
SPAG skills and pupils are more able to transfer these skills into their extended writing. Some of these pupils continue to find it difficult to
generalise concepts, particularly in Maths and need support to use maths skills to solve real life problems.
Non Academic
These pupils can present with a range of sensory needs which can limit their participation in whole class activities. They may require
sensory circuits or sensory breaks to allow them to refocus and return to a baseline to enable them to complete activities.
Pupils in the Moving On Pathway can lack resilience and struggle to persevere with an activity. There is a significant emphasis on extending
the pupils ability to attend to activities and they are encouraged to begin to recognise some of their own difficulties and what they can do to
help themselves overcome them. These pupils also need support to develop their resilience and tolerance of their peers. They can become
very frustrated in their work or with their peers, this can result in them either refusing to work or becoming very upset. Some of our Moving
On pupils have very low self esteem and find it difficult to accept praise or to accept when they may need to change or improve something.
Intent:
Pupils follow curriculum themes based on the National Curriculum which is differentiated to meet individual needs. Their work is increasingly
completed within groups or independently.

Implementation:
The Formal Curriculum
Foundation subjects are delivered through topic themes which are updated each half term. Work is differentiated into approximately three
levels depending on the specific needs of the class. Activities are presented as a range of practical and recorded activities. Key skills are
reinforced throughout the curriculum in order to embed knowledge. Where able, pupils are encouraged to make links between subjects,
basic skills are reinforced through all subjects taught. Pupils are increasingly able to record their work and activities independently. All
pupils have personalised English and Maths IEP targets which are taught in specific IEP sessions and more discretely through the topic
work. Some of our Moving On pupils work at an age appropriate level and are able to access the National Curriculum at an age appropriate
level, these pupils may also have the opportunity to complete KS2 SATs in English and Maths.

 The Informal Curriculum

This continues to be an essential part of the curriculum for our Moving On pupils where developing independence, tolerance and resilience and communication are a priority. Some of our Moving On pupils have specific sensory diets, set by our school OT, (SHINE Therapy), and participate in specific sensory activities throughout the day using sensory equipment such as weighted clothes, ear defenders etc. Alongside this, identified pupils participate in daily sensory circuits and complete the daily mile at the beginning of the morning and afternoon sessions. Sensory trays are available for pupils to access throughout the day. Some pupils have specific communication targets which are worked on throughout the school day, either as a standalone activity or within a topic, some pupils also access 1:1 sessions with our SALT. Pupils may also participate in Lego Therapy to help develop social interaction and specific language targets such as positional language. Some pupils follow the AFLS curriculum, in particular focussing on Community Participation and the role we can play in shaping our community. Pupils also participate in focussed well-being sessions to build resilience and develop mental and physical health as well as relaxation sessions and access to a calm / quiet space to enable them to develop their skills to self regulate. As part of their curriculum they also access a number of transition sessions in order to prepare them for their next steps in education. Life skills are developed through specific community sessions, such as shopping tasks, visits to local places and cookery sessions. Wellbeing ‘check ins’ are used across classes using our Lego feelings board to encourage children to recognise different emotions and to give reasons for feeling certain emotions. 

Impact
The impact of our curriculum is assessed in a number of different ways.
The Formal Curriculum
This is assessed using Bsquared and foundation subject assessments. IEP targets are continuously assessed and final assessments are
shared with parents each term. All pupils are baselines when they enter school. Key words, reading, comprehension and spelling ages are
all assessed on baseline and at the end of an academic year. KS2 SATs.
The Informal Curriculum
Parents views, SALT and SHINE impact reports. SLEUTH data.